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How to Make Your Own Turmeric Drops

How to Make Your Own Turmeric Drops

Turmeric has taken over the spotlight in the last few years as a spice or supplement with super powers. While many think it is the newest thing to hit the shelves, this potent root has actually had a huge following for thousands of years. A member of the ginger family, cooks and healers in Asia and India have been familiar with turmeric’s healing properties and use in cooking since approximately 2000 BC.

The main beneficial component of turmeric is the phytochemical curcumin. It works in tandem with a  volatile oil called turmerone among others. Along with the antioxidant properties, additional health benefits of taking turmeric may include:

  • Reduced anxiety
  • Eased arthritis and joint pain
  • Soothing relief for stomach issues
  • Balancing blood sugar
  • Improving lipid profiles
  • Brain, cardio, and tissue health

The downside is that the taste of turmeric on its own can cause many people to avoid taking it. When used in cooking, it may lose some of its beneficial properties. It needs to be combined with a carrier as well as something like quercetin to gain the most rewards from its use.

These turmeric drops are our answer to this problem. Enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup ground turmeric (approximately 5 ½ Tbsp)
  • 1 Tbsp quercetin powder
  • 3 Tbsp binding agent: raw honey OR Coconut oil OR Grass-fed ghee butter
  • 1/8 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/8 tsp ground black pepper

Directions

Wear protective clothing and cover anything that may become discolored – turmeric causes stains if you’re not careful.

  1. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and place in the freezer to chill.
  2. If your binding agent is thick, you can put it in a small saucepan over the lowest heat setting until it is of a pourable consistency.
  3. In a small mixing bowl, stir together the turmeric, quercetin, pepper, and ginger. Pour in the binding agent and mix thoroughly until you have a mixture that you can use to form pills or small balls.
  4. If you’re using honey, it will be easy to pinch off pea-sized drops and roll into small balls. For coconut oil or ghee, you may need to use a small spoon or scoop to form the drops. Whichever you’re using, place the drops/pills onto baking sheet you previously chilled.
  5. Place the baking sheet with drops back into the freezer and allow to freeze until firm.
  6. Once frozen, remove drops from the sheet and put in a freezer storage bag or container and keep in the freezer.

You can use these turmeric drops as needed. Keep in mind that there is fat and/or sugar in the mixture, so you won’t want to overindulge. As with any additive, diet, or supplement, it is advisable to discuss it with your physician before use.

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21 Comments

  • Carly Alzen Posted May 5, 2020 2:17 pm

    What would you recommend as a sub for the quercetin? More turmeric?

    • Charles w Boston Posted May 5, 2020 3:46 pm

      Need more info onquercetin

      • Jan Wilbers Posted May 7, 2020 12:41 pm

        I can’t find powder quercetin

      • The Lost Herbs Posted May 7, 2020 1:02 pm

        Hi Jan,

        Thank you for your comment.
        If you want to purchase quercetine powder, please check the link below:
        https://www.amazon.com/Quercetin-Dihydrate-Powerfully-Cardiovascular-Anti-Inflammatory/dp/B01DPW5IWY/

        God bless!

      • The Lost Herbs Posted May 7, 2020 12:59 pm

        Hi Charles,

        Thank you so much for your question.
        Quercetin is a plant flavonol from the flavonoid group of polyphenols. It is found in many fruits, vegetables, leaves, seeds, and grains; red onions and kale are common foods containing appreciable amounts of quercetin. Quercetin has a bitter flavor and is used as an ingredient in dietary supplements, beverages, and foods.
        Quercetin is present in various kinds of honey from different plant sources.

        God bless!

    • The Lost Herbs Posted May 7, 2020 12:51 pm

      Hi Carly,

      Thank you for your comment. You can use more turmeric if you don’t want to add quercetin.

      God bless!

  • Lisa Posted May 5, 2020 4:18 pm

    Do you swallow it?

    • The Lost Herbs Posted May 7, 2020 12:54 pm

      Hi Lisa,

      Thank you so much for your comment. Yes, you are correct!

      God bless!

  • Bonnie Posted May 5, 2020 4:41 pm

    I take turmeric every day and wouldn’t mind being able to make these drops. But where do you get the guercetin and what is it? Have everything else.

    • The Lost Herbs Posted May 7, 2020 1:04 pm

      Hi Bonnie,

      Thank you so much for your comment.
      Quercetin is a plant flavonol from the flavonoid group of polyphenols. It is found in many fruits, vegetables, leaves, seeds, and grains; red onions and kale are common foods containing appreciable amounts of quercetin. Quercetin has a bitter flavor and is used as an ingredient in dietary supplements, beverages, and foods.
      Quercetin is present in various kinds of honey from different plant sources.

      If you want to purchase quercetine powder, please check the link below:
      https://www.amazon.com/Quercetin-Dihydrate-Powerfully-Cardiovascular-Anti-Inflammatory/dp/B01DPW5IWY/

      God bless!

  • Debbie Posted May 5, 2020 5:33 pm

    Yes I also want to know if you are supposed to swallow or eat it. I also want to know if quercetin is commonly found in any spice isle?

    • The Lost Herbs Posted May 7, 2020 1:11 pm

      Hi Debbie,

      Thank you so much for your comment. Turmeric drops must be taken by mouth.

      Quercetin is available from pharmacies, health food stores, and online.

      God bless!

  • Catherine Posted May 5, 2020 6:50 pm

    What quercetin product do you recommend?

  • Kathi Posted May 5, 2020 10:00 pm

    Just googled quercetin – Quercetin is a plant pigment with potent antioxidant properties. It’s present in many common foods, such as onions, apples, grapes, and berries. It can also be purchased as a dietary supplement for a variety of uses. Interesting. And GNC has it.

    • The Lost Herbs Posted May 7, 2020 1:18 pm

      Hi Kathi,

      Thank you so much for sharing this information.

      God bless!

  • Marissa Varley Posted May 7, 2020 1:39 pm

    CAn the Quercetin be substituted with anything else. I already eat plenty of fresh fruit and veg on a daily basis, so, can i omit it?

    • The Lost Herbs Posted May 14, 2020 10:05 am

      Hi Marissa,

      Thank you so much for your comment. You can use more turmeric if you don’t want to add quercetin.

      God bless!

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  • Sharon Posted January 1, 2021 7:05 pm

    How many drops is it advisable to take and how often?

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