fbpx
How To Make a Powerful Calendula Extract to Keep in Your Medicine Cabinet (with pictures)

How To Make a Powerful Calendula Extract to Keep in Your Medicine Cabinet (with pictures)

Beautiful to look at in full bloom, the sunny orange calendula – also known as marigold – has a wealth of herbal uses that are worth learning about.

With both antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties, the fresh petals can be infused in boiling water, then cooled to clean minor wounds and treat conditions such as mouth ulcers or sore gums. Gargling with the infusion can soothe a sore throat and rolling a ball of petals between your fingers and applying directly to insect bites or nettle stings can be really effective in numbing the discomfort.

Dried Petals

It’s worth, however, gathering the petals and drying them in the sun, or in an airy, warm place to harness even more of the properties of these brilliantly colored flowers.  Making your own calendula tincture or resinous extract is straightforward and rewarding.  Easily stored, it’s a powerhouse addition to your herbal medicine cabinet.

You’ll need:

Around 50g dried calendula petals

Grain alcohol to cover – between 500 – 700 ml (the key ingredient, it works better than oil)

Method

  1. Pack the calendula (not too tightly) into a suitable, clean container and pour over the alcohol. Stir gently and keep out of direct sunlight for two weeks, mixing and pressing with the spoon gently every two or three days.
  2. Strain the liquid through a muslin cloth into a wide, clean dish, squeezing the contents to extract as much of the calendula essence as possible.
  3. Cover with foil or a cloth, ensuring that the cloth does not touch the contents of the dish. Now leave until the alcohol starts to evaporate.  The rate at which the liquid which start to reduce will vary according to temperature and humidity, but will take around 1 – 2 weeks on average.
  4. Keep checking – if you want to strain and bottle the tincture then do so while the extract is still liquid and not too viscous.
  5. If you prefer to make a stickier resinous extract, then wait until all of the alcohol has evaporated, and you are left with a glossy residue, which you can then spoon into a cosmetic-type jar.

Storage and Shelf Life

Both will have a long shelf life of 2 – 3 years if kept in brown/green glass or opaque containers and stored out of direct sunlight. Never take or administer any medicines or treatment without the approval of a health-care advisor, but traditional remedies include diluting drops of the tincture in water to treat ear infections, low fever or other ailments.

People report dabbing the resin directly onto minor wounds for pain relief and healing, using the tincture as an immune system booster and to support healthy liver function. There are so many uses for calendula extract and it’s worth doing some in-depth research to learn more about the potency and potential of this remarkable plant.

You may also like: 

How to Make an Alcohol Extraction with Goldenseal to Fight Inflammation

Similar to Morphine: The Best Natural Painkiller that Grows in Your Backyard (Video)

DIY Wilderness Soap And Shampoo From This Plant

10 Beautiful Plants That Are Secretly Killing Your Garden

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Please Spread The Word - Share This Post

35 Comments

  • Jim Parker Posted May 1, 2020 1:37 pm

    Why the clickbait (“ But 99% percent of recipes are still missing a key ingredient that makes this one of the most potent natural medicines you can stockpile at home:”) in Nicole‘a email linking your this post?
    It really cheapens you’re entire image.

    • Trish Posted May 1, 2020 3:13 pm

      I don’t think she’s concerned with her image.
      It’s proper to put the important part of your message in the title.
      Please if I can urge you to not post comments that are unkind and completely opinion based.
      Blessings,
      Trish

      • Claude Posted May 4, 2020 6:12 pm

        Hi Trish,

        Thank you so much for your kind words.

        God bless!

      • Jessica Mayse Posted May 19, 2020 7:30 pm

        Bless your kind sweet ❤️

    • Margaret Tirpak Posted May 2, 2020 9:58 pm

      What’s missing?

      • The Lost Herbs Posted May 5, 2020 7:05 am

        Hi Margaret,

        Most recipes don’t have high proof grain alcohol. This is great to extract everything you need from the plant.

        God bless!

    • Claude Posted May 4, 2020 6:10 pm

      Hi Jim,

      Thank you so much for your feedback. We will take everything you said in consideration.

      God bless!

  • Dan Gough Posted May 1, 2020 4:14 pm

    How many spelling mistakes and grammar mistakes can you legitimately have in your derogatory comment about being cheap can you have? That is until your message is completely meaningless……

  • Dan Gough Posted May 1, 2020 4:15 pm

    Let’s all ask Jim.

  • Vikk Simmons Posted May 1, 2020 4:17 pm

    I appreciate this article as I had forgotten about calendula. I had used it as a salve years ago. I didn’t mind the language at all and, in fact, it did grab my attention–and I’m glad it did.

    I may be a bit confused, though. I’m not sure exactly sure either what she meant or what exactly is the key ingredient most recipes miss. If you could clarify? (Thanks.)

    • Sherri Vadala Posted May 1, 2020 6:54 pm

      I have found from other recipes they are using the dried flowers in oil, this recipe calls for soaking them in alcohol. I wonder if that is what she is referring to?

      • The Lost Herbs Posted May 5, 2020 7:14 am

        Hi Sherri,

        You are absolutely right! Great comment.

        God bless!

    • The Lost Herbs Posted May 5, 2020 7:06 am

      Hi Vikk,

      Most recipes we found online don’t have high proof grain alcohol. This is great for extraction.

      God bless!

  • Kym Posted May 1, 2020 6:52 pm

    Am I right in assuming that the key ingredient is the high proof grain alcohol, which would strip everything essential from the plant? In the past I have infused oil’s. This makes a lot of sense.

    • The Lost Herbs Posted May 5, 2020 7:14 am

      Hi Kim,

      Yes, you are correct! Thank you for your comment.

      God bless!

  • Eadie Camp Posted May 3, 2020 11:55 pm

    The email says, “But 99% percent of recipes are still missing a key ingredient that makes this one of the most potent natural medicines you can stockpile at home.” What is it??? Why is it not in the article?!

    • The Lost Herbs Posted May 5, 2020 7:16 am

      Hi Eadie,

      You are right, we should have been more specific. Most recipes we found don’t have high proof grain alcohol they have infused oils. We will clarify in the article.

      God bless!

  • Dee Posted May 4, 2020 4:52 pm

    I would think that the alcohol is the key ingredient. Doesn’t the flower still contain its own oil that would be released when soaking in the alcohol? Just a though.

    • The Lost Herbs Posted May 5, 2020 7:16 am

      Hi Dee,

      Thank you so much for your comment. Yes, the key ingredient in alcohol.

      God bless!

      • Sue Posted May 21, 2020 4:29 pm

        Lost herbs can I get the clarifying in email

  • Dan Gough Posted May 4, 2020 6:29 pm

    The extra ingredient is brains. You need them “in”your head to compete this one.

  • wayne Perschbacher Posted May 10, 2020 6:24 am

    I got the video but there is no click now button at all

  • Rachel Delvalle Posted May 18, 2020 3:05 pm

    I don’t know where to get high-proof grain alcohol. Can I use vodka?

    • The Lost Herbs Posted May 20, 2020 11:39 am

      Hi Rachel,

      Thank you so much for your interest in our work.
      Yes, alcohol is a good substitute for high-proof grain alcohol.

      God bless!

      • Patricia Morehouse Posted June 26, 2020 5:37 pm

        @Patrick, oh is that what it is, okay thank you. I know what Everclear is. Lol I have never heard it called high grain before but my cousins used to make Jello shots with Everclear in Texas.😊

    • Patrick Posted May 22, 2020 2:43 am

      Everclear

      • Patricia Morehouse Posted June 26, 2020 5:32 pm

        Hey Patrick, oh is that what it is, okay thank you. I know what Everclear is. Lol I have never heard it called high grain before but my cousins used to make Jello shots with Everclear in Texas.😊

    • Patricia Posted June 26, 2020 7:04 am

      Thank you for asking this question, I have the same issue unless I look on Amazon to see if they have the High Grain Alcohol. When you use Vodka it will say 40% but it actually means 80 proof. Thought you may want to know that also.

  • Sherri Posted June 2, 2020 7:39 pm

    Hello, I have the stained mixture setting in a bowl covered with foil in a dark closet, its been there for over two weeks now and I have yet to get any real evaporation. It is still about the same volume as it was, can this take longer based off of where I have it stored? Just wondering what I need to do to speed up the process? Any thoughts? Thanks so much! 🙏

    • Gigi Posted June 26, 2020 1:31 pm

      Hi Sherri, it can’t evaporate if it’s covered.

      • Sherri Posted June 26, 2020 2:46 pm

        Hi GiGi, it states in bullet #3 to cover it;

        “Cover with foil or a cloth, ensuring that the cloth does not touch the contents of the dish. Now leave until the alcohol starts to evaporate. The rate at which the liquid which start to reduce will vary according to temperature and humidity, but will take around 1 – 2 weeks on average”
        This is why I asked.
        But I will try that instead, does make sense that it wouldn’t evaporate, but I was just following what the instructions were.

  • Patricia Morehouse Posted June 26, 2020 5:32 pm

    Hey Patrick, oh is that what it is, okay thank you. I know what Everclear is. Lol I have never heard it called high grain before but my cousins used to make Jello shots with Everclear in Texas.😊

  • Patricia Morehouse Posted June 26, 2020 5:36 pm

    @Patrick, oh is that what it is, okay thank you. I know what Everclear is. Lol I have never heard it called high grain before but my cousins used to make Jello shots with Everclear in Texas.😊

  • Trackback: How Long Do Dried Herbs, Ointments, Syrups and Tinctures Last? - The Lost Herbs
  • Trackback: How To Treat Eczema Naturally - The Lost Herbs

Add Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

I accept the Privacy Policy